The Good Friday Agreement Of 1998

By April 13, 2021 No Comments

The agreement has never solved the source of this fear. Indeed, it expressly avoided it and instead chose to create a system in which the two positions could coexist peacefully. The agreement first did so by acknowledging the “persistent and equally legitimate political aspirations” of each side. Then came an intelligent provision: the Good Friday Agreement (GFA) or the Belfast Agreement (in Irish: Comhaonté Aoine in Cheasta or Comhaonté Bhéal Feirste; Ulster-Scots: Guid Friday Greeance or Bilfawst Greeance)[1] is a couple of agreements signed on 10 April 1998 that put an end to most of the violence of the Troubles, a political conflict in Northern Ireland that had erupted since the late 1960s. This was an important development in the Northern Ireland peace process in the 1990s. Northern Ireland`s current system of de-decentralized government is based on the agreement. The agreement also created a number of institutions between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as well as between the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom. As part of the agreement, it was proposed to build on the existing Inter-Parliamentary Commission in English-Irish. Prior to the agreement, the body was composed only of parliamentarians from the British and Irish assemblies. In 2001, as proposed by the agreement, it was extended to include parliamentarians of all members of the Anglo-Irish Council.

“… It is up to the inhabitants of the island of Ireland alone to exercise their right to self-determination, in agreement between the two parties and without external hindrance.” In 2004, negotiations were held between the two governments, the DUP, and Sinn Féin, for an agreement to restore the institutions. The talks failed, but a document published by governments detailing the changes to the Belfast agreement was known as the “comprehensive agreement.” However, on 26 September 2005, it was announced that the Provisional Republican Army of Ireland had completely closed its arsenal of weapons and had “taken it out of service”. Nevertheless, many trade unionists, especially the DUP, remained skeptical. Among the loyalist paramilitaries, only the Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF) had decommissioned all weapons. [21] Further negotiations took place in October 2006 and resulted in the St Andrews Agreement. The agreement consists of two related documents, both agreed on Good Friday, 10 April 1998 in Belfast: on Friday 10 April 1998 at 5.30pm, an American politician named George Mitchell, who led the discussions, said: “I am pleased to announce that both governments and political parties have reached an agreement in Northern Ireland.” The participants in the agreement were composed of two sovereign states (the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland), with armed forces and police forces involved in the riots. Two political parties, Sinn Féin and the Progressive Unionist Party (PUP), were linked to paramilitary organisations: the IRA (Commissional Irish Republican Army) and the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF). The Ulster Democratic Party (UDP), associated with the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), had withdrawn from the talks three months earlier.

In these circumstances, power-sharing has proved impossible to maintain. Meanwhile, voters in each community began to turn away from moderate parties, and instead support for Sinn Féin and the DUP grew, supplanting the SDLP and UUP.